Current printmaking exhibitions in London

There are a few interesting printmaking exhibitions currently on in London.

First up; ‘Etching:The Infernal Method’ curated by Norman Ackroyd and part of ‘Art Sales’ series at the Royal Academy of Arts. “This selection of works for sale by Royal Academicians and invited artists celebrates the diversity of contemporary etching practice.” It’s free and on until 19 February 2018.

Norman Ackroyd RA, Thirsk Hall, 2006. Edition of 90. Etching. 17.5 x 28 cm. (RA, exhibition Etching:The Infernal Method)

Next we have; ‘The business of prints’ at the British Museum, free and on until 28 January 2018. “This wide-ranging exhibition selects fine examples from the nation’s print collection to look at how prints were created, developed, bought and sold in the period 1400–1850.”

Abraham Bosse, The workshop of a printer (detail), etching, 1642. (The British Museum, The business of prints exhibition)

Next up is ‘Eclectic: The Julie and Robert Breckman Collections at the V&A’, free and on until 4 March 2018. “This display features some of the best prints and posters acquired for the V&A through The Julie and Robert Breckman Print Fund over a decade of collecting.”

Eclectic: The Julie and Robert Breckman Collections at the V&A (image not credited by the V&A).

Finally we have this exhibition to #SaveTheDate for and #NotToBeMissed as its only on for a short while. ‘One-off: The Masters, Monoprint’, 8 – 19 November  at the Bankside Gallery. “This is a compelling series of annual exhibitions focusing in turn on one of the many techniques practised by our members, … This year’s technique is monoprint and the show is being curated by Morgan Doyle RE, a highly skilled printmaker who frequently uses this technique.”

Morgan Doyle RE, As it is, monoprint (Bankside Gallery – One-off The Masters, Monoprint exhibition)



Exhibition Visit to Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse

Firstly to say a funny name for this exhibition, I think it gives one the impression that there will be a fair few pictures from Monet and Matisse featured in the exhibition. Lots of paintings by Monet but only two (if I remember correctly) by Matisse. Anyway I still recommend this exhibition, not just for the two aforementioned big names, but for the other artists featured of which a few I had never heard of , and for me personally had executed some of the best paintings in the show.

First up Santiago Rusiñol (1861-1931), a Catalan modernist painter. In one of the rooms his painting ‘Jardines de Aranjuez’ dominates the room with it’s fiery golden glow of receding trees,a backdrop to a single white foliaged tree standing dead centre in a grassy circle surrounded by flower beds. No internet search reproduces this image true to the intense colour as seen in the gallery. The orange glow seemed to illuminate beyond the painting itself.

Another Rusiñol painting that caught my eye is the one below ‘The Green Wall’, again the colour in the below image does not reflect the vibrancy of the original. The perspective in this image is so skillfully executed: the path is just pulling the viewer to step into this picture and explore; the path leading us downwards but the vertically rising walls enticing us up.


You can view numerous works by Rusiñol here


Another Spanish artist that I was impressed by was Joaquin Sorolla (1863-1923), his paintings are very lively, playing with colour contrasts, light and shade, form and movement. I can’t find any images online for my favourite pictures from the exhibition. During my research I did discover that his home and garden in Madrid is now a museum to his works, and there is a fantastic virtual tour through the property:


Another artist I hadn’t come across before is Henri Le Sidaner (1862-1939) a French artist, who when asked what school (of art) he belonged to, said: ‘None. But if you absolutely insist on categorising me, I am an intimist.’ The paintings below ‘Steps, Gerberoy’ and ‘Le Pavillion’ in reality have a much more opalescent painted effect, which creates a dreamy atmosphere, as if between two breaths something magical might happen. Again the colours in these images do not justice to the real paintings.

Steps, Gerberoy by Henri Le Sidanier

TheAthenaeumLePavillion_Henri Le Sidanier


Okay I will finish up with two big name artists, and two paintings I hadn’t seen before, Edvard Munch ‘Apple Tree in the Garden’ and Raoul Dufy ‘The Little Palm Tree’. Wonderful colours and brushwork, oh to be able to walk into any of these paintings would be a joy.




Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse is on at The Royal Academy of Arts until the 20th April 2016.