Munch, Rembrandt, Symbolist Printmaking Exhibitions Now at the British Museum

There are ‘heavy-weight’ printmakers currently on display at the British Museum; two large ticketed exhibitions – ‘Edvard Munch’ and ‘Manga’, and two free displays on ‘Rembrandt: thinking on paper’ and ‘Symbolist Prints’. I did the Munch and free displays  in one visit and I highly recommend them to anyone interested in drawing, printmaking and symbolist art. I have yet to see the ‘Manga‘ exhibition, I am pretty excited about it, it looks fantastic!

Edvard Munch – love and angst – till 21 July 2019 – British Museum

An opportunity to see a collection of Munch’s prints, that cannot be missed. His coloured pastels and paintings of ‘The Scream’ are so famous and familiar to me that it is hard to ‘see’ them in any meaningful way. But viewing his lithograph of ‘The Scream’ in the exhibition I was struck anew by the tension between the peaceful scene and the figure vibrating with horror and anxiety.

Edvard Munch, The Scream. Lithograph, 1895. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

 

Rembrandt thinking on paper – till 4 August 2019

For me Rembrandt is a master of line and tone in drawing/printmaking; in this exhibition of 65 prints and drawings, you get to see the work in progress, the printed image in different states (a real treat).

Rembrandt

From The British Museum blog: Rembrandt’s depictions of women.

Symbolist Prints – till 18 July 2019

A small display that packs a punch. Wonderful to see some old favourites by Odilon Redon such as his smiling ‘Spider’ lithograph. My favourite print in this display is ‘Seaweed’, an aquatint by Olaf Lange.

Olaf Lange Seaweed aquatint crop

Olaf Lange (1875-1965), Tang (Seaweed), 1912, Aquatint. British Museum, Presented by AEC Simoni, 1958,0730.39.

 

I do hope some of you get the opportunity to visit the above exhibitions – Enjoy!

 

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The American Dream pop to the present Exhibition at the British Museum

I saw The American Dream pop to the present print exhibition at the British Museum and I highly recommend a visit especially if you are interested in print. This exhibition explores the last 60 years of American history through the printed output of great artists responding to the changing world around them. The exhibition is visually and historically dense with intelligent art. I picked up postcards of two of my favourite prints from the exhibition.

‘Pay Attention’ 1973 Bruce Nauman Litograph © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London 2017. Image coutesy Mary Ryan Gallery, new York.

 

‘Dead End 2’ from Rusty Signs 2014 Ed Ruscha Mixografia print on handmade paper. © Ed Ruscha, courtesy of the artist

Weekly Sketch – After Paolozzi – 19/03/2017

I visited the Eduardo Paolozzi exhibition at the Whitechapel gallery yesterday, and it fair took my breath away, leaving me inspired and a bit overexcited! All I can say is go, go, go! I especially loved the lower ground floor which included work from the 1940s through to the 60s. His early drawings, prints and sculptures really spoke to me – they were intense, energetic and (his prints) full of amazing colour combinations. His print work is so interesting because up close it is full of lots of detail, but the prints still work from far away – clever stuff.

As usual the gallery have provided an amazing catalogue to accompany the exhibition, including great images of all the work displayed. I managed to get a very good discount (alomost £10 off rrp) on the paperback from Wordery (a few remaining at a discounted price).

Here is a pen drawing from me of Paolozzi’s brutalist concrete sculpture Seagull & Fish; and then I tried to emulate the lines in a drawing of a barn owl – which I like, thought it isn’t very brutal!

And here are two images from the exhibition to whet your appetite:

Fish, collage and ink, about 1946, Eduardo Paolozzi

https://art.nationalgalleries.org/art-and-artists/38102/fish-about-1946?artists%5B20399%5D=20399&search_set_offset=30

 

Parrot from the portfolio As is When, screenprint, 1965, Eduardo Paolozzi

 

(© Catherine Cronin)

 

EDWARD BAWDEN AND HIS STUDIO

One of my favourite artists…

Exhibition: Edward Bawden and his Studio

Location: The Higgins, Bedford

Date: 11th February 2017 – 28th January 2018

Details: Between 1981 and 1989 Edward Bawden donated the contents of his studio to The Higgins Bedford (then the Cecil Higgins Art Gallery). The works included items from the walls of his house, the insides of cupboards, plan chests and portfolios. They cover the full span of his career and the many disciplines and mediums that he mastered. Through letters, photographs and most importantly his work, this exhibition offers unique insight into Bawden’s studio practice.

Bawden often took inspiration from his surroundings and the views from his studio frequently feature in his work. He was also meticulously tidy, and the order and discipline he applied to his designs was equally in evidence in his workroom, with its polished mahogany desk, neatly laid out materials, cherished library of reference books and collection of…

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Last weekend for Art Hub Print Open: 23 & 24 July 2016

Last weekend for the Art Hub Print Open exhibition at Art Hub Gallery in Deptford.

The gallery is a 15min walk from Greenwich Market, I recommend doing both! Have a look on this map https://goo.gl/maps/HHwTapfKi8z

Ever wondered what I look like? Well here I am on the private view night with my two colourful Alhambra linocuts.

ArtHubPrivateView2016

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Exhibition Visit to Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse

Firstly to say a funny name for this exhibition, I think it gives one the impression that there will be a fair few pictures from Monet and Matisse featured in the exhibition. Lots of paintings by Monet but only two (if I remember correctly) by Matisse. Anyway I still recommend this exhibition, not just for the two aforementioned big names, but for the other artists featured of which a few I had never heard of , and for me personally had executed some of the best paintings in the show.

First up Santiago Rusiñol (1861-1931), a Catalan modernist painter. In one of the rooms his painting ‘Jardines de Aranjuez’ dominates the room with it’s fiery golden glow of receding trees,a backdrop to a single white foliaged tree standing dead centre in a grassy circle surrounded by flower beds. No internet search reproduces this image true to the intense colour as seen in the gallery. The orange glow seemed to illuminate beyond the painting itself.

Another Rusiñol painting that caught my eye is the one below ‘The Green Wall’, again the colour in the below image does not reflect the vibrancy of the original. The perspective in this image is so skillfully executed: the path is just pulling the viewer to step into this picture and explore; the path leading us downwards but the vertically rising walls enticing us up.

GreenWall_SantiagoRusinol

You can view numerous works by Rusiñol here www.allpaintings.org/v/Art+Nouveau/Santiago+Rusinol+Prats/?g2_page=1

 

Another Spanish artist that I was impressed by was Joaquin Sorolla (1863-1923), his paintings are very lively, playing with colour contrasts, light and shade, form and movement. I can’t find any images online for my favourite pictures from the exhibition. During my research I did discover that his home and garden in Madrid is now a museum to his works, and there is a fantastic virtual tour through the property:

http://museosorolla.mcu.es/visita_virtual/visita_virtual.html

 

Another artist I hadn’t come across before is Henri Le Sidaner (1862-1939) a French artist, who when asked what school (of art) he belonged to, said: ‘None. But if you absolutely insist on categorising me, I am an intimist.’ The paintings below ‘Steps, Gerberoy’ and ‘Le Pavillion’ in reality have a much more opalescent painted effect, which creates a dreamy atmosphere, as if between two breaths something magical might happen. Again the colours in these images do not justice to the real paintings.

Steps, Gerberoy by Henri Le Sidanier

TheAthenaeumLePavillion_Henri Le Sidanier

 

Okay I will finish up with two big name artists, and two paintings I hadn’t seen before, Edvard Munch ‘Apple Tree in the Garden’ and Raoul Dufy ‘The Little Palm Tree’. Wonderful colours and brushwork, oh to be able to walk into any of these paintings would be a joy.

Munch_AppleTreeintheGarden

 

Raoul_Dufy_LittlePalmTree

Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse is on at The Royal Academy of Arts until the 20th April 2016. www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/painting-modern-garden-monet-matisse

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