Editing Squash Screenprint

My first blog of the year! Very late I am sorry to say, but in January my laptop decided to die and I’ve had some trials and tribulations with new laptops and Windows 10 issues. Anyway I am back on track now. I wanted to share with you the final edition of the Squash screenprints that I created last year at City Lit.

My final set of prints looked like this; but I was not completely satisfied with the way the squash outlines got lost in the background.

 

I decided to edit the prints to create a smaller image that focuses on the small round squash. It was quite hard to decide to do away with the rest of the print because I had put so much work into producing it. I think that is always a moment of struggle for all artists, knowing when to discard work even if you feel greatly attached to it. I should mention that I sat on the decision for months! I lived with the idea before executing it. I think you have to guard against rash decisions that you might regret. Time passing allows for a fresh perspective. I am very happy with the edited images, which I have backed onto A5 card. They are for sale via my Artfinder shop.

(© Catherine Cronin)

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Happy Holidays – Christmas 2017

As we approach Christmas I would like to wish you all Happy Holidays and I hope you all have a festive and merry break! It has been a great pleasure being part of the WordPress community of bloggers and seeing all the creative and accomplished art being produced. It is very inspiring! Enjoy this recent linocut design from me of a cheeky red squirrel in the snow amongst the pine cones.

(© Catherine Cronin)

Squash Screenprint

I carried on my recent screenprinting adventures by signing up for a second course at City Lit. This would consist of 5 sessions, 3 hours long. This time I wanted to try to get away from thinking about printed layers as in a linocut print; which is sort of what I did when I made my flower screenprint. Though I am pleased with that result, I wanted to explore more what screenprinting can do as its own medium. Two things I was interested in exploring was painting into the screen and pulling monoprints, and making a halftone photo-stencil which would convey tones.

I wanted to use my recent squash watercolour work for my photo-stencil. I combined in Photoshop a collaged image that showed a range of tones as grayscale and so should work as a halftone image. Halftoning is where the image is made up of a variety of dots, similar to printed newspapers. The final image below in black and white is the image I used to make a halftone photo-stencil.

For the first layers of my screenprint; I combined painting into the screen and pulling monoprints; and then using a paper stencil to print a slightly transparent teal colour on top. This meant that all the backgrounds would be slightly different.

I really like these backgrounds, but I was worried that as they have strong colour and bold shapes, my squash photo-stencil would get too lost when printed on top. In screenprinting to get an opaque colour you need to add white, which makes it difficult to get strong opaque dark colours.

I wanted to print my photo-stencil in red; below is a screenprint of just the stencil on its own; and then printed in red on top of my printed layered background. I admit I was disappointed, I did think that the red squash did not jump to the foreground enough; so I switched to the darkest and most opaque ink – black. I printed my series in black ink; but on reflection I now think I prefer the red inked squash! I would be very interested to know your thoughts on these final images?

I have really enjoyed screenprinting and I think it suits my figurative style of drawing, especially when combining monoprinting, paper stencils and photo-stencils. I look forward to continue  to work with monoprinting and paper stencils in my home studio; probably combining with linocut printing too.

(© Catherine Cronin)

Flower Screenprint

I hadn’t done screenprinting in many years until recently when I signed up for a beginners class at City Lit. Here are the results of that short course, a multi-layered Flower print. The prints with the most colours were created by printing a rectangle of block colour (orange and blue);  using a paper stencil to create the green colour of leaf, stem and flower petals in part; and then the photo-stencil of my flower line drawing in red or black ink. For some of the prints I off-set the photo-stencil and printed it a second time which makes those prints a bit hard to look at! a bit psychedelic! I also printed the flower photo-stencil on its own and I intend to work into these prints with drawing inks. Fun times! I’m looking forward to making more screenprints.

(© Catherine Cronin)

Pear Pop Linocut Prints available

I’ve put these Pear Pop linocut and chine–collé prints in my Etsy shop. Use coupon code MAYSPRINGSALE to get 15% OFF. Each design is a limited edition of 10 but with varying colours of chine-collé. Printed with Caligo relief water-based ink on specialist printing paper, Zerkall 150 gsm. The colour collaged paper is Japanese straw silk paper. These linocuts are companion pieces to my ‘Apple Pop‘ linocut from last year. I’ll be posting the rest of my Pear Pop linocuts soon in my other online shops.

(© Catherine Cronin)

MAY SPRING SALE – PRINTS – 15% OFF

I’m having a May Spring Sale in my online shops; to get 15% off price in my Etsy and Folksy shops please use coupon code MAYSPRINGSALE. The discount is already applied in my Artfinder shop. Enjoy!

(© Catherine Cronin)

Seville and Cordoba Holiday 2017

Continuing on from last weeks blog on Seville; I have a few more pictures to share with you. We went for a day trip to Cordoba, where you can see the famous Cordoba Mezquita or  Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba. Just as it sounds, in a beautiful grand Mosque a Reanaissance Cathedral nave was literally built into the middle of the Mosque in the 16th century. King Charles V of Castille and Aragon, who gave permission for the Cathedral nave to be built, reportedly said on visiting “”they have taken something unique in all the world and destroyed it to build something you can find in any city.” As I do not have a fancy camera I could not take very good pictures inside the Mezquita, but I urge you to take a look at this collection of images here.

In Cordoba we also visited the ‘Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos’ or Palace of the Christian Monarchs. This fortress was one of the primary residences of Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. This palace is much smaller than the one in Seville; but it is still worth visiting and has beautiful gardens.

Back in Seville, one of the most modern structures we visited was the Metropol Parasol, it claims to be the largest wooden structure in the world. It consists of six giant parasols in the form of giant mushrooms, which have a sky-walk and viewing platform atop; the underground levels house a small museum of Roman and Moorish remains discovered on site. The space underneath the parasols can be used for public events. I really liked the organic shape of this structure which offers (via a lift) very fine views of the city and the Cathedral.

(© Catherine Cronin)