Flower Screenprint

I hadn’t done screenprinting in many years until recently when I signed up for a beginners class at City Lit. Here are the results of that short course, a multi-layered Flower print. The prints with the most colours were created by printing a rectangle of block colour (orange and blue);  using a paper stencil to create the green colour of leaf, stem and flower petals in part; and then the photo-stencil of my flower line drawing in red or black ink. For some of the prints I off-set the photo-stencil and printed it a second time which makes those prints a bit hard to look at! a bit psychedelic! I also printed the flower photo-stencil on its own and I intend to work into these prints with drawing inks. Fun times! I’m looking forward to making more screenprints.

(© Catherine Cronin)

Pear Pop Linocut Prints available

I’ve put these Pear Pop linocut and chine–collé prints in my Etsy shop. Use coupon code MAYSPRINGSALE to get 15% OFF. Each design is a limited edition of 10 but with varying colours of chine-collé. Printed with Caligo relief water-based ink on specialist printing paper, Zerkall 150 gsm. The colour collaged paper is Japanese straw silk paper. These linocuts are companion pieces to my ‘Apple Pop‘ linocut from last year. I’ll be posting the rest of my Pear Pop linocuts soon in my other online shops.

(© Catherine Cronin)

The American Dream pop to the present Exhibition at the British Museum

I saw The American Dream pop to the present print exhibition at the British Museum and I highly recommend a visit especially if you are interested in print. This exhibition explores the last 60 years of American history through the printed output of great artists responding to the changing world around them. The exhibition is visually and historically dense with intelligent art. I picked up postcards of two of my favourite prints from the exhibition.

‘Pay Attention’ 1973 Bruce Nauman Litograph © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London 2017. Image coutesy Mary Ryan Gallery, new York.

 

‘Dead End 2’ from Rusty Signs 2014 Ed Ruscha Mixografia print on handmade paper. © Ed Ruscha, courtesy of the artist

MAY SPRING SALE – PRINTS – 15% OFF

I’m having a May Spring Sale in my online shops; to get 15% off price in my Etsy and Folksy shops please use coupon code MAYSPRINGSALE. The discount is already applied in my Artfinder shop. Enjoy!

(© Catherine Cronin)

Weekly Sketch – Alhambra Garden View – 23/04/2017

At last a watercolour I feel okay with showing! I really like using watercolour, I often use it to colour drawings; but I’ve been trying to just use it on its own which I find a bit more difficult. Anyway I’m pleased with this A3 painting of steps from one green courtyard  leading down to another interior garden in the Alhambra Palace.

(© Catherine Cronin)

 

Seville and Cordoba Holiday 2017

Continuing on from last weeks blog on Seville; I have a few more pictures to share with you. We went for a day trip to Cordoba, where you can see the famous Cordoba Mezquita or  Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba. Just as it sounds, in a beautiful grand Mosque a Reanaissance Cathedral nave was literally built into the middle of the Mosque in the 16th century. King Charles V of Castille and Aragon, who gave permission for the Cathedral nave to be built, reportedly said on visiting “”they have taken something unique in all the world and destroyed it to build something you can find in any city.” As I do not have a fancy camera I could not take very good pictures inside the Mezquita, but I urge you to take a look at this collection of images here.

In Cordoba we also visited the ‘Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos’ or Palace of the Christian Monarchs. This fortress was one of the primary residences of Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. This palace is much smaller than the one in Seville; but it is still worth visiting and has beautiful gardens.

Back in Seville, one of the most modern structures we visited was the Metropol Parasol, it claims to be the largest wooden structure in the world. It consists of six giant parasols in the form of giant mushrooms, which have a sky-walk and viewing platform atop; the underground levels house a small museum of Roman and Moorish remains discovered on site. The space underneath the parasols can be used for public events. I really liked the organic shape of this structure which offers (via a lift) very fine views of the city and the Cathedral.

(© Catherine Cronin)